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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but when it stopped being successful, i turned the anc into a military armed wing because my plate goal, my overriding principle was premium for my people and justice for my people and anything that would get me there was what road i would take, that's a pragmatist, a pragmatic politician, not a saint. >> rose: jerry? >> yes, you know, i agree, rick is heartfelt on that because he was very pragmatic but one of my reflect shunls after 20 plus years is how real he was. i mean, you know, if you saw him flirtatious or joyful or festive or playful, it was that way when you were behind the scenes or when you were in front of the camera. but wow know, when he went out on any public appearance, howie was being, how he was being projected, how he was moving, i will tell you a very interesting story when we were back back as a family to see him right at towards the end, when the world cup was there. we walked into have just a little personal time with him and he said to me, how did we do? and that is an amazing comment, because he was so interested in how the country reflected around the world, how
of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in not only believing that but practising it with every fibre of his being. as we look today at the lessons of mandela's extraordinary life and incredible achievements, at his contribution not just to south africa, which goes without saying, but to the wider world and at why he has become such an iconic figure, two factors stand out. first, he is perhaps the best example we have had in the past 100 years of how political leaders, by force of personality, transform themselves from politicians into statesman can by their sheer personal effort change the world and make what was impossible possible and then deliver it. he is not the only one who has done so. we should not think of him as unique. gorbachev, by the force of his personality,
't even tell his anc colleagues that he was doing that. they negotiated for years in private in order to get this done. the persistence, the courage to do that was incredible. >> incredible courage and many occasions, he went against the leadership of the anc, the political movement. and didn't tell them or when he did tell them, he would essentially say i know this is not what you want me to do, but i feel it is the thing we must do and almost all instances, he was proven correct and he was somebody -- >> go ahead, had the respect of them so that they trusted him even though they had great reservations about the other side. >> they had great reservations. they argued with him. but never the less, he was so deserving of trust that even when they disagreed with him, they knew he was the leader and not the leader in a sense of i'm in charge, but in a sense of i am the purpose, the vision, the one who's going to get us there, so trust me. come along with me. walk with me and that was his great strength. >> thank you so much. >> we'll have much more on the life of nelson mandela and talk
called at that time the anc terrorists and when he came out of prison, when he said i say to you all, take your guns, your knives, your pangers and throw them into the sea, fully declaring in his first -- practically his first public address after 28 years of being in the wilderness in prison, no, this has to be peaceful. this was huge and then you know, you heard president zuma say this is the father, the founding father of our democratic south africa, and you heard robyn talk about the tribal homeland where he lived and the rural area where he's going to be finally laid to rest, and i think i will never forget the pictures not just of the snaking lines of hundreds of thousands of millions of people in the towns and the cities who cast their ballots for nelson mandela in 1994, but the helicopter shots of the countryside, when people were literally lining up in zigzag lines so quietly, so peacefully, so joyfully, just to have the privilege of casting their first ever vote in 1994, this majority black country, they had never had that right before and they stepped up to the plate. ther
understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of his stature to be continue to be treated as a terrorist by the united states. we needed to do this and do it before he passed away. but also, we need to honor his memory today by also making sure that homeland security honors of legislation that secretary kerry and for that matter senator obama when they were both senators, helped to pass. so, yes, officially they are off the terror list but the way in which homeland security continues to interpret the laws, they are creating problems for the united states. >> that history is a reminder as we're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
economic and political waters. with the political icons demise the future of the a.n.c. is being thrown into question. mike hanna reports from johannesburg. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. in the void left by nelson mandela's death, an awareness of challenges to come. the growing gap between rich and poor is a reminder of nelson mandela's promise of a better life is to be realised. >> i think the challenge we have for nelson mandela is to face the reality that if we don't do something for everybody, the young people will revolt, because if they remain poor and others are richer then they revolt. >> the fault lines within south african society is all-too clear of it was a labour dispute ruling in the killing of 30 at the mary carna mine -- marikana mine. many argue that the root cause was a government losing touch with those that put it in power. >> if you look at what happened over the last few years in terms of public violence, you can see that we have many, many people that don't feel represented by those in government. and the resort to violence is because we don'
amazing story that he told me was on the night before they left prison calling all the anc prisoners together and saying, yes, they would be justified in acts of revenge, retaliation and retribution, but there could never then be a strong, successful, multiracial society, and that was his second great achievement, to achieve change through reconciliation. but, you know, there was a didder achievement, refusing to rest or relax when he gave up the presidency. he had great achievement to his name. he himself wrote that in the first part of his life he had climbed one great mountain to end apartheid, but now in his later life he wanted to climb another great mountain, to rid the world of poverty and especially the outrage of child poverty. and i need speak of only what i saw in the times that i worked with him, how quietly and without fanfare he went about his work. 2005 i flew to south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade him to come to london so that he could then persuade the finance ministers of the need for debt relief to relieve poverty, and this he did. and then in 2006 with
assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when you see these images. thank you. appreciate that. the image of bill clinton at robben island, what an amazing treat to see that up close. >> you've got world leaders going there, including he was very critical of george w. bush over the iraq war and bush is heading down there. he was critical of the united states way back in 2003. i think he said if there's a krntd has committed unspeakable an frosties, it is the united sta
about 8%. let all two to the lobby, shall we, and get ourselves some stock? anc theater gearing up to go public. most loyal customers buying shares. members of anc sub rewards program, they offered the same price as bank and wall street zugs institutions according to jerry lopez, so everybody getting in on the action. >> the only thing i care about is what this means for ticket prices. i am saying it is expensive to go to the movies. >> i don't think you will see prices go up. i think they are sharing the love. >> sharing the love, is that what they're doing? >> exactly. thanks, allison. coming up next on "new day," budget de ja vu. four days and counting until congress can get its act together this time around. accidence of u.s. leaders convergeing on south africa, paying tribute to nelson mandela. chris cuomo is there live. he is speaking which someone who knew mandela well. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)